CHAPTER 4
Connective Tissue
67
Figure 4-10A.
A representation of reticular ±
bers in the
pancreas.
Reticular ±
bers
are composed of
type III collagen
, have small
diameters, and do not form large bundles. They form a deli-
cate, architectural framework in the pancreas, liver, and lymph
nodes and can be found in many tissues.
Figure 4-10B.
Reticular ±
bers, pancreas.
Silver stain,
3
762
An example of
reticular ±
bers
in the exocrine pancreas is shown.
The thin, reticular F
bers surrounding pancreatic acinar cells
form a netlike supporting framework. In most locations, reticu-
lar F
bers are produced by reticular cells (F
broblasts); in some
places, reticular F
bers can be secreted by smooth muscle cells
(blood vessels) or by Schwann cells (peripheral nerve tissue).
D. Cui
Ground substance
Reticular
fiber
Pancreatic cell
A
B
Figure 4-11A.
A representation of reticular ±
bers in the
liver.
These
reticular ±
bers
are arranged in cords (column pattern) to
form a F ne framework, which holds the
hepatocytes
in place.
Figure 4-11B.
Reticular ± bers, liver.
PAS/reticular stain,
3
544
An example of the
reticular ± bers
in the liver is shown. The retic-
ular F
bers appear black because of the silver stain. The structure
of the
hepatocytes
is difF
cult to identify because their cytoplasm
does not take up silver. The spaces between the reticular F
bers
are the lumens of
sinusoids
running between the plates of the
hepatocytes.
D. Cui
Ground substance
Sinusoid
Hepatocyte
(liver cell)
Reticular
fibers
A
B
Hepatocytes
Hepatocytes
(liver cells)
(liver cells)
Hepatocytes
(liver cells)
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