380
UNIT 3
Organ Systems
Oviducts (Fallopian Tubes)
Lumen
Lumen
Lumen
Mucosa
Mucosa
Mucosa
Muscularis
Muscularis
Muscularis
Serosa
Serosa
Serosa
Peg cells
Peg cells
Peg cells
Lamina propria
Lamina propria
Lamina propria
Cilia
Cilia
Cilia
Ciliated cells
Ciliated cells
Ciliated cells
A
Cilia
Microvilli
Basal bodies
Nucleus of
ciliated cell
Basal lamina
B
Figure 19-9A.
Oviduct (fallopian tube).
H&E, left
3
17; right
3
680
The
oviduct
(fallopian tube)
can be divided into four regions: the
infundibulum
,
ampulla
,
isthmus
, and
intramural portion
(Fig. 19-1).
The
infundibulum
is a funnel-shaped opening that has a fringe of tentacle-like extensions called
± mbriae
. The
ampulla
has a rela-
tively large, labyrinthine lumen where fertilization usually takes place. The
isthmus
is a narrow portion of the oviduct, close to the
uterus. The
intramural portion
is the terminal segment and is located within the uterine wall. The wall of the oviduct consists of a
mucosa
(simple columnar epithelium and lamina propria),
muscularis
(inner circular and outer longitudinal smooth muscle), and
serosa
. The epithelium of the oviduct contains
ciliated cells
and
peg cells
. The cells vary in height according to hormonal stimula-
tion. The oviduct provides an ideal environment for the fertilization of the oocyte and initial development of the embryo as well
as transportation of the
zygote
(fertilized oocyte) to the uterus. On the
left
is a low-magni± cation view of the ampulla; on the
right
is a higher magni±
cation view of the mucosa.
Ciliated cells
help sweep the oocyte toward the uterus. Each ciliated cell has a pale
appearance with many cilia on its apical surface. These cells have a large nucleus and a fair amount of cytoplasm.
Peg cells
are
secretory cells that produce nutrient-rich secretions to nourish and protect the oocyte and promote fertilization. They are small
in size and interspersed among the ciliated cells.
Figure 19-9B.
Epithelial cells lining the
oviduct.
EM,
3
8,900
The
simple columnar epithelium
that lines
the oviduct is composed of two cell types
(
ciliated cells
and
peg cells
); only
ciliated cells
are shown here. These ciliated cells func-
tion, along with smooth muscle of the mus-
cularis, in mixing the contents (
gametes
) of
the lumen and in transporting the oocyte and
zygote at a precisely controlled rate along the
length of the lumen of the oviduct. The num-
ber and activity of cilia change in response
to changes in the levels of steroid hormones
throughout the reproductive cycle, reaching
a peak at the time of ovulation when estro-
gens dominate. Note that these cells also bear
numerous
microvilli
, suggesting an additional
absorptive function.
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