314
UNIT 3
Organ Systems
Figure 16-8A.
Sublingual glands.
H&E,
3
123
Sublingual glands
are the smallest of the three major salivary
glands. They are paired glands and are located deep in the fl
oor
of the oral cavity, anterior to the submandibular glands. They
are covered by the oral mucosa, but have no capsule (dense con-
nective tissue) enclosing them as the other two major salivary
glands do. Sublingual glands have about 8 to 20 small ducts,
which open into the crest of the sublingual fold on the fl
oor
of the oral cavity. They are
mixed glands
, and contain
serous
and
mucous secretory cells
, but predominantly mucous cells. As
in submandibular glands,
serous demilunes
are present; sublin-
gual glands are also classiF
ed as
compound
(
branched
)
tubu-
loacinar glands
(see ±igs. 16-3A and 3-28A). Two intralobular
ducts located inside connective tissue septa are labeled here.
Sublingual glands are innervated by parasympathetic nerve
F bers from branches of the
facial nerve
(
CN VII
).
Mucous
Mucous
acini
acini
Mucous
acini
Interlobular
Interlobular
ducts
ducts
Interlobular
ducts
Septum
Septum
Septum
A
Mucous cell
Mucous cell
Mucous cell
Serous demilune
Serous demilune
Serous demilune
Capillary
Capillary
Capillary
Mucous acini
Mucous acini
Mucous acini
Intralobular
Intralobular
duct
duct
Intralobular
duct
Serous demilune
Serous demilune
Serous demilune
B
Figure 16-8B.
Sublingual gland.
H&E,
3
179; inset
3
408
Mucous cells
make up the majority of the cells in the
sublingual
glands
and are distributed throughout the gland. Some mucous
cells may be capped with serous cells (
serous demilunes
); very
occasionally complete serous acini may be present. Mucous cells
stain lighter than serous cells and they are often arranged in an
elongated tubular structure (
mucous acinus
) with a fl
attened or
round lumen. These mucous cells have dark nuclei located at the
basal end of the cells. Nuclei of the mucous cells are smaller and
fl atter than in serous cells. The large intralobular ducts in the
sublingual glands are short, and the striations of the ducts are
not particularly obvious. The small intralobular ducts (
interca-
lated ducts
) are similar to those of the other two major salivary
glands; they receive secretions directly from secretory cells.
CLINICAL CORRELATION
Lymphocytes
Sublingual
gland tissue
C
Figure 16-8C.
Sialadenitis.
H&E,
3
109
Sialadenitis
is the infl
ammation of salivary tissues or
salivary
glands caused by injuries, viral or bacterial infection, auto-
immune disease, or stones within the salivary gland ducts.
Ductal obstruction due to stones (
sialolithiasis
) may lead to
painful gland enlargement and
abscess
, most often because of
bacteria such as
Staphylococcus aureus
. Histologic F
ndings in
acute sialadenitis would show inF
ltration of glandular paren-
chyma by abundant neutrophils. The most common cause of
viral sialadenitis is mumps, often affecting the parotid glands.
Sjögren syndrome
is an autoimmune disease characterized by
periductal and periacinar
lymphocytic
in±
ltrates
, formation of
lymphatic nodules, periductal F
brosis, and destruction of the
glands. This image shows chronic sialadenitis with a lympho-
cytic inF
ltrate within the glandular parenchyma.
previous page 329 Dongmei Cui -  Atlas of Histology with Functional and Clinical Correlations 2011 read online next page 331 Dongmei Cui -  Atlas of Histology with Functional and Clinical Correlations 2011 read online Home Toggle text on/off