CHAPTER 14
Oral Cavity
257
Tooth Development (Odontogenesis)
Figure 14-8
Overview of Tooth Development (Odontogenesis)
Figure 14-9A
Bud Stage, Weeks 8–9
Figure 14-9B
Cap Stage, Weeks 10–11
Figure 14-10A
Bell Stage, Weeks 12–14
Figure 14-10B
Bell Stage, Cell Layers
Figure 14-11A
Apposition (Crown) Stage, Dentinogenesis
Figure 14-11B
Apposition (Crown) Stage, Amelogenesis
Figure 14-12A
Tooth Root Development
Figure 14-12B
Tooth Eruption
Figure 14-12C
Clinical Correlation: Dilaceration
Figure 14-13A
Clinical Correlation: Gemination, Incisor
Figure 14-13B
Clinical Correlation: Amelogenesis Imperfecta
Figure 14-13C
Clinical Correlation: Enamel Pearl
Enamel
,
Dentin
,
and Dental Pulp
Figure 14-14A
,
B
Enamel, Tooth
Figure 14-14C
Clinical Correlation: Enamel Fluorosis
Figure 14-15A
,
B
Dentin, Tooth
Figure 14-15C
Clinical Correlation: Dentinogenesis Imperfecta
Figure 14-16A
Clinical Correlation: Vitamin D–Resistant Rickets
Figure 14-16B
Clinical Correlation: Dentin Dysplasia
Table 14-3
Dental Hard Tissue
Figure 14-17A
,
B
Dental Pulp
Figure 14-17C
Clinical Correlation: Pulp Abscess
Periodontium
Figure 14-18A
Acellular Cementum, Cervical Region of Tooth Root
Figure 14-18B
Cellular Cementum, Apical Region of Tooth Root
Figure 14-18C
Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone
Figure 14-19A
Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone, Tooth Root
Figure 14-19B
Clinical Correlation: Tooth Ankylosis
Synopsis 14-1
Pathological and Clinical Terms for the Oral Cavity
Oral Mucosa
Introduction and Key Concepts for Oral
Mucosa
The
oral cavity
refers to the internal part of the mouth and can
be divided into the
oral vestibule
and the
oral cavity proper
.
The
oral vestibule
is the space between the inner lips, cheeks,
and front surface of the teeth. The
oral cavity proper
is the space
between the upper and lower dental arches, extending from the
inner surface of the teeth to the oropharynx. The structures
inside of the oral cavity include the
lips
,
cheeks
,
tongue
,
teeth
,
gingiva
,
palates
(
hard
and
soft
),
salivary
glands
, and
tonsils
. The
tonsils are discussed in Chapter 10, “Lymphoid System,” and
salivary glands are discussed in Chapter 16, “Digestive Glands
and Associated Organs.” The structures in the oral cavity are
lined by an oral mucosa, which includes an overlying epithe-
lium and underlying connective tissue. The oral mucosa can be
divided into three types based on differences in the epithelial
covering, organization of the connective tissue, and associated
functions:
lining
,
masticatory
, and
specialized mucosa
.
LINING MUCOSA
is covered by
nonkeratinized strati±
ed
squamous epithelium
with two distinct layers: the
stratum basale
and
stratum spinosum
. The epithelium of the lining mucosa is
similar to the epidermis of the skin, except that it has neither
a stratum corneum nor a stratum lucidum, and the stratum
granulosum is often absent (see Chapter 13, “Integumentary
System,” Figs. 13-2 and 13-3B). The nonkeratinized strati±
ed
epithelium is moistened by saliva. The connective tissues of the
lining mucosa can be divided into the
lamina propria
and the
submucosa
. The
lamina propria
is a thin layer of loose connec-
tive tissue containing many elastic ±
bers and relatively few col-
lagen ±
bers. This layer is equivalent to the dermis of the skin
and is located beneath the epithelium. The
submucosa
is a thick
layer of connective tissue, which contains minor salivary
previous page 272 Dongmei Cui -  Atlas of Histology with Functional and Clinical Correlations 2011 read online next page 274 Dongmei Cui -  Atlas of Histology with Functional and Clinical Correlations 2011 read online Home Toggle text on/off